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Reptiles & Amphibians

Welcome to the EcoPark!
 
Are you ready to spot Reptiles & Amphibians? Below is a list of the most common Reptiles and Amphibians that can be found within the Clearview EcoPark! Please remember to stay on the path when identifying/ spotting species.

Interested in documenting your sightings?
Please visit the following website to document your sightings:

*All information, facts, details and pictures below were sourced from: http://www.ontarionature.org/protect/species/reptiles_and_amphibians/index.php



Midland Painted Turtle

All painted turtles have an olive to black carapace (upper shell) with red or dark orange markings on the marginal scutes (enlarged scales on the shell), as well as red and yellow stripes on the head and neck. The carapace is broad, smooth and flat, and generally reaches a length of 12 to 14 centimetres, but one individual has been measured at 19.5 centimetres. The midland painted turtle has a yellow or dark tan plastron (lower shell) with a darker, irregular “butterfly” marking along the midline.

Midland Painted Turtle
Image Credit: Joe Crowley


Northern Map Turtle

The northern map turtle is named for the markings on its shell, which look like the contour lines on a topographical map. The carapace (upper shell) is olive green with fine yellow lines and has a distinct ridge (keel) along the centre and serrations along its back edge. Both the head and legs have an intricate pattern of bright yellow lines. This turtle has a yellow spot behind the eyes. The plastron (lower shell) is cream to yellow in adults, but in juveniles the plastron has dark lines along the seams. Females get much larger than males and grow up to 27 centimetres in carapace length, whereas males grow to only 13 centimetres long.

Northern Map Turtle
Image Credit: Joe Crowley


Snapping Turtle

The snapping turtle is Ontario’s most prehistoric-looking turtle species. Its long tail has a series of triangular spikes along the top that are reminiscent of those of a stegosaurus. The carapace (upper shell) is tan or olive to black in colour, has a coarsely serrated anterior (front) edge and three longitudinal ridges, and is often covered with algae. The plastron (lower shell) is very small. The maximum length of the carapace in this species is 47 centimetres.

Snapping Turtle
Image Credit: Joe Crowley


Eastern Red-backed Salamander

This small and slender salamander has two different colour phases. The more typical is black or dark grey with a broad, straight-edged stripe down the back from head to tail. This stripe is usually red or brownish orange but may be yellow, pink or grey. A leadback phase also occurs, in which the salamander is solid black or dark grey. In both phases, this salamander has black and white mottling on the belly and lower sides.

Eastern Red-backed Salamander
Image Credit: Joe Crowley


Eastern Hog-nosed Snake

The eastern hog-nosed snake has an unmistakable upturned snout, which gives this species its name. The coloration and patterning of this species is highly variable. Some individuals may have alternating dark blotches down the back and sides on a lighter background, which can be olive, tan, yellow, brown or grey. Others may lack patterning altogether and are a solid colour, usually olive or grey. Although the blotches down the back and sides may be absent on some individuals, a large blotch behind each eye is always present. This thick-bodied snake has a wide neck, which it flattens out (much like a cobra’s hood) during its defensive display. The scales of the eastern hog-nosed snake are keeled (ridged down the centre), and the underside of the tail is noticeably lighter in colour than the belly. These snakes can grow to just over a metre in length.

Eastern Hog-nosed Snake
Image Credit: Joe Crowley


American Toad

The American toad is a large, squat toad with brown, reddish or olive skin and dark blotches containing one to two spots or “warts” of various colours. The belly is white with dark spots. These toads often have a light line down the middle of the back. The tadpoles of this species are nearly black. Adult American toads grow to about 11 centimetres long. The call of this species is a monotone trill up to 30 seconds long, preceded by a single, slightly lower introductory note. In a breeding chorus, each male calls a different note.


American Toad
Image Credit: Joe Crowley


Wood Frog

The wood frog may be reddish, tan or dark brown but always has a dark mask under and behind the eyes. Some individuals have a light line down the middle of the back. This species has a dark blotch on the chest near each front leg. The belly is white and may have some dark mottling. Adult wood frogs can grow to up to eight centimetres in length.

Wood Frog
Image Credit: Joe Crowley